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Reading recap: August

August was my worst reading month so far and I only managed to finish two books. I have no excuses other than that I was busy working. I did start two more books, but I didn’t manage to finish them in August. And even though I read eight books in July, I’m now two books behind the schedule in my reading challenge of fifty-five books. I’ll have to step up. As has been my habit throughout the year, one book was from my reading list and the other wasn’t.
First book was Ride the Storm by Karen Chance, the long-awaited next chapter in her Cassandra Palmer urban fantasy series of time-travelling Pythia and her entourage of vampires, demons and mages. One vampire and one mage in particular. As always, it was a wild romp through space and time – at times a bit too wild. The first part of the book was constant tumbling from crisis to battle and back with no breathers or plot development in between, as if the author was afraid that the reader will get bored if something earth-shattering isn’t co…

My #worldcon75 experience

Here’s the long overdue report from my day at the WorldCon 75, my first ever time attending. The event was held on August 9-13 in my home country, Finland, so it was a once in a life-time chance to experience it with a minimum trouble. I originally thought to attend the entire five days, but life intervened in the form of work, and so I could only attend on Saturday. I tried to make the most of it by planning a full day.

I arrived at the conference centre about fifteen minutes after the doors opened at nine in the morning, and the queue was already at least fifty metres long. It caused me a few palpitations until I figured it was the line for people who hadn’t purchased their day passes in advance. I had, so I just walked past, trying not to look gleeful. Half an hour later I felt bad for all those people when it was announced that the day was sold out, which left most of them outside. The queue for pre-purchased passes was three persons long, the shortest line for me the entire day. I…

Reading recap: July

July was an excellent reading month for me in numbers and mostly in content too. But I pretty much went outside my reading list.
First I finished reading Those Below by Daniel Polansky, a book which I’d started reading already in May, but had put aside for more pressing books. It’s the second and last book in his Empty Throne duology, and I’m not entirely sure why I read it, since I didn’t much like the first book. This wasn’t any better. Like with the first, the episodic chapters seemed pointless. They had little or no character development and only two of the four main characters advanced the plot in any meaningful way; the other two were mere witnesses with ends to match. The culmination of the story felt equally pointless, war and annihilation for the sake of themselves with no hope or redemption for anyone. As a commentary on war it works; as a work of fiction it's a let-down. However, the last two chapters rose a little above the rest, so it wasn’t a complete disappointment.


N…

Reading recap: June

June was a great reading month for me, mostly because I was on holiday, so I had time to read. Also, because it was cold and raining, and I had nothing else I’d rather have been doing. I ended up finishing five books and the sixth was almost done by the end of the month, so I’ll count it for this month too. Three of the books were from my reading list, three were new ones.
First up was a book outside my list and the most extraordinary book I’ve read in a while. The Library at Mount Char by Scott Hawkins is a story of children abducted from their parents by a strange, heartless, and strict man. He wants to bring them up to make them unique and perfect in their skills, be it languages or killing, by basically torturing them. They grow up to be psychopaths with little or no connection to the real world. But then their teacher – Father – goes missing and the group has to enter the normal world to get him back. Little by little, elements of fantasy are added to the narrative until in the en…

Reading recap: April and May

It’s already June and I realise I’ve completely forgotten to update you on my reading in April, so this is a double feature for May too. April and May weren’t particularly good reading months in terms of numbers read, partly because I read a couple of longer books that took longer to finish, partly because other engagements kept me from reading – I know, right – and partly because I started and then discarded a number of books that I just couldn’t get into. But those books that I ended up reading and finishing, five in all, were all absolutely brilliant. Four of the books were from my reading list, and the last one was an absolutely necessary addition.
First up was one of my favourite series, Black Dagger Brotherhood by J.R. Ward. Book number fifteen, The Chosen, was as good as any in the series, which hasn’t had a weak book yet. I really like Ms Ward’s style of edgy writing, and especially how she introduces characters and their backstories throughout the series, and follows them afte…

Reading recap: March

I had a good reading month last month. Everything I read was delightful and entertaining, on top of which they were good books too. Again, I didn’t quite stick to my reading list; two out of five books were outside it.
First up was A Gathering of Shadows by V. E. Schwab. It’s the second book in her Shades of Magic trilogy set in a world of parallel Londons that have different levels of magic and which can be travelled between by a special person with enough magic and right words. Grey London is in the Regency England of the ‘real’ world with little or no magic, Red London is abundant with magic, and White London is in permanent winter and constantly struggles to regain its magic by any means necessary. In the first book, Lila gets accidentally drawn from Grey to Red London by Kell who can travel between the worlds, and decides to stay. In this second book, she enters the stage as a pirate and ends up taking part in a tournament of magic. Most of the book is taken by the tournament, and…

Reading recap: February

It’s time to look at what I’ve read the previous month. I finished four books, two of which were from my reading list and two of which weren’t. Unfortunately, it wasn’t a very satisfying selection of reading.
First up is Because of Miss Bridgertonby Julia Quinn, the first book in her new Rokesbys series, which wasn’t on my original reading list. She’s written numerous Regency romances about the Bridgerton family, and while I haven’t read them all, most of those that I’ve read have been delightful. Not this one. First of all, it was set in an earlier era, around 1770s. It’s a time totally different from her usual books, but you wouldn’t know it by reading this one. The historical setting is minimal and for the most part people behaved like they do in her other books. Waltz is mentioned even, even though it hadn’t been made fashionable in continental Europe yet, let alone in England. The story progresses like a steam engine, slow and steady, with no twists or turns, highs or lows. For a …

Caught between series

I have currently two series that I write, Two-Natured London paranormal romance series and Tracy Hayes, P.I. detective series. The first has six books (or five and a half) and the latter has three books published – or will be by February 23rd. I like writing both, and while they’re not exactly best-sellers, both deserve my attention. But I’m only able to write one book at a time – I’ve tried to multitask and it didn’t work – so now that I’m about to start my next writing project, I’m caught up with a dilemma: which series should I dedicate my attention to next?

From purely a calendar point of view, I should write a Two-Natured London book next. The previous one was published a year ago, so it’s long overdue. The series currently has some uplift too, as Amazon finally made the first book free, so it would make sense to have a new book in the pipeline.
The problem is that I don’t have a clear idea what I want to write. I have four heroes to choose from that all deserve my attention, but I…

Reading recap: January

I read six books in January, all from my reading list. It was a mixture of fantasy and sci-fi, with fantasy winning, especially since I’m not entirely sure if MiĆ©ville’s book is fantasy or sci-fi. Here’s my recap.
Those Above by Daniel Polansky starts his new Empty Throne trilogy. The premise was interesting, a world shared by humans and those above, god-like creatures fairly devoid of all humanity. The first book introduced a cast of human characters that all have a reason to hate those above and one who doesn’t, and a plot that likely aims at starting a war against them. But the episodic chapters into each character’s lives failed to convince me. While things happened in them and to the characters, they all seemed mainly to be slaves of the plot. The characters didn’t change and none of them actively moved the plot, and while there were hints that the characters’ lives might be connected, nothing was made of it yet. Basically, I could’ve read the first chapters introducing each chara…