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New book - new cover(s)

It's finally here, the cover for the Warrior's Heart. It took longer than I expected to design it, mainly because it involved photo manipulation techniques I didn't know how to use and had to learn as I went. I'm very happy with the result and hope you like it too.
 

Since this is a second book on a series, I wanted it to look similar to the cover for the Wolf's Call, hence the moonlight background and the muscular man. I also wanted it to be slightly different than covers in this genre usually are. Therefore, I was very happy when I found the picture of the early morning moon. It's rusty and striking. I talked about fonts in my previous post, namely the difficulty of finding suitable ones. I chose one called Gothic Ultra for the title. I like the shape of the letter W especially, and the slightly ragged edges of the letters. The texts are mostly in white or in different shades of it, because dark colours didn't stand out at all and light colours made the cover look like a poster for the Miami Vice - not an effect I was going for. 

The design is simple, because the picture is so striking. I had some difficulty deciding on whether or not to use the definite article on the title and left it out in the end, after recommendations from the Writer's Discussion Group on Google+. Thank you for your advice. I added a tag-line too, and I like how it adds texture to the picture.

I made some changes to the cover of the Wolf's Call too. It has new fonts and it, too, got a tag-line. I'll be uploading the new cover as soon as I have time. I have the edits of the Warrior's Heart to go through so that I can have the book for you as soon as possible. Stay tuned.


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